Main content

Life 5 - Killing Poverty

Life 5 - Killing Poverty

In December 2002, President Mwai Kibaki was swept to power in Kenya based largely on his pledge to end the government corruption endemic to the previous regime of Daniel arap Moi. But ministers in the present government admit that corruption hasn't been entirely wiped out. HIV/AIDS has made matters much worse. International donors are giving over 200 million dollars for AIDS programs every year, but many Kenyans believe that these vital funds are not getting through. The price of the government's apparent unwillingness to tackle corrupt officials has been that donor funding for Kenya is scaled back. And yet at the same time Kenya's government is calling for debt relief on its $600 million annual debt repayments.

Kenya was one of the countries which signed up to a global partnership deal aimed at halving the number of people living in poverty by 2015. In return for more foreign aid, Kenya promised to govern itself more openly and honestly: its answer to weeding out corruption is the Anti-Corruption Commission, established in May 2003.