Who's Next?

WHO'S NEXT? examines how the lives of Muslim-Americans have been affected in the aftermath of the September 11th terrorist attacks. It focuses on six Muslim families — citizens and long-time legal residents — from diverse countries and widely different circumstances. In one way or another all of them have been targeted by federal agencies, hate groups, and even former friends solely on the basis of their religious beliefs.

Family separations, threats of deportation, repeated airport detentions, unexplained travel restrictions, have become part of the daily lives of thousands of Muslims who are innocent of any crimes or even suspicious behavior. If one group can be singled out because of their religious beliefs then who's next?

The film encourages us all to choose knowledge over ignorance, take action to prevent hate speech, and to welcome strangers into our lives so that the challenges of marginalized communities can be effectively addressed.

'Who's Next? is a moving portrayal of the unrelenting assault on the lives and livelihoods of Muslims in post-9/11 America. The film provides educators with a powerful tool for helping students to challenge manufactured narratives of an Islamic threat and to contemplate constructive ways of building bridges across racial and religious difference.' Todd Green, Associate Professor of Religion, Luther College, Author, The Fear of Islam: An Introduction to Islamophobia in the West

'An important and compelling addition to the resources available that highlight the experiences of Muslims in the US in the post 9/11 era. In following a selection of families, it allows viewers into the lives of regular people who have been impacted by Islamophobia and its structural manifestations. With only half of Americans knowing a Muslim personally, Who's Next? provides a window into the lives of our fellow Americans who happen to be Muslim as well as of those who have sought refuge here.' Meira Neggaz, Executive Director, Institute for Social Policy and Understanding

'The best and most profound movie I've seen recently...As unsettling as it is important. It is an extremely well-made documentary, uncluttered, never resorting to inflated dramatics. The drama is in the stories of the families. Who's Next? is the type of artistic expression essential to those who cherish the concept of democracy.' David Rothenberg, host, Any Saturday, WBAI

'Poignant...Who's Next explores the current challenges faced by Muslims in the United States - along with their resilient efforts to raise and educate their children and contribute to a better society.' The Rev. Dr. Chloe Breyer, Executive Director, Interfaith Center of New York

'This important film should be part of every educational platform. It reminds us that we all have the capacity to raise up the other with dignity and respect.' Rabbi Laurie Phillips, Beineinu NYC

'An inspiring documentary, showing the resilience of Muslims in America and a call to action for all who care about preserving human rights and civil rights in our country.' Dr. Sarah Sayeed, Chair and Executive Director, Civic Engagement Commission of NYC

'With deep compassion and sharp insight, Cooperstein Charney gives us a painful view of what it is like to be Muslim in America today.' Roberta Brandes Gratz, Journalist, Author, We're Still Here Ya Bastards: How the People of New Orleans Rebuilt Their City

'This work brings alive the heroism and struggles of the Muslim community in today's world. It gives us all hope in telling the story of leaders stepping up for their families, communities and society as a whole as they face the challenges and realities of hate and Islamophobia.' Rabbi Bob Kaplan, Director, Center for Community Leadership, Jewish Community Relations Council of New York (JCRC-NY)

'An urgent, inspiring message with beautiful and moving portraits of American Muslims and non-Muslims living with mutual respect and care in a politically divisive age. Who's Next? shows the reality of Islamophobia in the US, but brings hope and humor as well. An ideal film for family and classroom viewing during the Trump presidency and for many years to come.' Emilio Spadola, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Director of Middle East and Islamic Studies, Colgate University

Citation

Main credits

Charney, Nancy Cooperstein (film director)
Charney, Nancy Cooperstein (film producer)
Geissbuhler, Luke (film producer)
Geissbuhler, Luke (director of photography)
Keuper, Jay (film producer)
Keuper, Jay (editor of moving image work)

Other credits

Director of photography, Luke Geissbühler; editor, Jay Keuper; composers, Peter Golub, Omar Fadel.


Docuseek2 subjects

Distributor subjects

American Democracy
American Studies
Anthropology
Civil Rights
Family Studies
Global Issues
Hate Speech
History
Human Rights
Immigration
Islamic Studies
Law
Middle Eastern Studies
Migration and Refugees
Multicultural Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Race and Racism
Religion
Social Justice
Sociology

Keywords

9/11,Martin Niemoller,Imam Ali Masshour,Goshen,Palestinian,COPO,Mohammad Razvi,Trinidad,Amy Mbarek,Cheik Ahmed Mbarek,muslim ban,President Trump,ISIS,FBI,Homeland Security, Department of Defense,muslim americans,muslim,islam,september 11,new york city,terrorism,xenophobia,religion,marginalized communities,donald trump,Trinidad,Mauritania,Peace Corps volunteer,hate crimes against muslims,Tampa fire,Islamic Leadership Council of New York,hijab,quran,Egypt,hotspots,Babatunde Tinubu,Shahid Ali Khan,deportation,USCIS,Mohammad Khan,arranged marriage,Brooklyn,Coney Island Hospital,Islamic School,Baruch,Bangladesh,Twin Towers,maqluba,Asian vs Arab work ethic,gay muslim,green card gone,Masum,Afridi,defining American muslim,community support for muslims,Times Square interfaith rally,family separations,deportation threats,airport detentions,travel restrictions; "Who's Next?"; Bullfrog Films

Related Films

Between Two Worlds

A personal essay revealing the passionate debates over identity and generational…

Rain in a Dry Land

Two Somali Bantu families leave behind a legacy of slavery in Africa and…

East of Salinas

Jose is an excellent student with a bright future except that he is undocumented,…